PAGER - Common Building Types

Mexico

Reinforced concrete multistory buildings

This is a reinforced concrete (RC) multistory residential building in Mexico. This type of construction is found mostly in large cities where space is limited. Typically buildings of this type have eight or more stories. Members of the middle and upper income classes are the target market for this type of construction. In areas of low seismic risk, waffle slab floor systems without structural RC walls are preferred by developers primarily due to their speed of construction. In areas of medium to high seismic risk, it is typical for this type of building to have a dual system, which combines RC moment frames and RC structural walls as the main lateral load resisting elements. The RC floor systems are constructed of waffle slabs or solid slabs. RC buildings account for about 80% of the entire housing stock in Mexico. Buildings constructed after 1985 are expected to perform well under seismic forces, especially in Mexico City, where the building construction code has been substantially updated to incorporate lessons learned during the 1985 earthquake.

Reference: EERI and IAEE\'s World Housing Encyclopedia (Report #115) - Mario Rodriguez, Francisco G. Jarque

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Reinforced concrete multistory buildings image
Reinforced concrete multistory buildings image

Confined Masonry Construction

This is a special type of confined masonry constructed using alternating courses of lightweight concrete blocks (inexpensive in Mexico) with courses of fired clay bricks (more expensive), and confined with cast-in-place reinforced-concrete tie-beams and tie-columns. The impact of confining elements in masonry walls includes: a) enhancing their stability and integrity for in-plane and out-of-plane earthquake loads, b) enhancing their strength (resistance) under lateral earthquake loads and, c) reducing their brittleness under earthquake loads and hence improving their earthquake performance. Usually, this type of construction is being used for housing in rural and urban regions of Mexico, but it has also being used for warehouses and apartment buildings up to three stories high.

Reference: EERI and IAEE\'s World Housing Encyclopedia (Report #160) - Arturo Tena-Colunga, Artemio Juárez-Ángeles, Victor Hugo Salinas-Vallejo

Building Image
Confined Masonry Construction image
Confined Masonry Construction image

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*Building types and their descriptions are taken from the World Housing Encyclopedia (WHE) database when available or based on additional research performed by the PAGER team. This information is provided with the understanding that it is not guaranteed to be correct or complete, and conclusions drawn from such information are the sole responsibility of the user.