2000 - 2001 Public Lecture Series
at Caltech

Please join us as we launch a new Public Lecture Series!

October 24 - Tuesday
Living With Earthquakes in Southern California Lucy Jones, USGS

January 18 -Thursday
The Music of Earthquakes Andy Michael, USGS

March 15- Thursday
Did You Feel It? David Wald, USGS

May 1-Tuesday
Pent-up Stress Puts the Squeeze on L.A. Ken Hudnut, USGS


October 24 - Tuesday
Living With Earthquakes in Southern California Lucy Jones, USGS

Enjoy Earthquakes 101 with southern California's "Seismo-Mom". We just happen to live right next to the boundary between the North American Plate and the Pacific Plate. We know that boundary as the San Andreas Fault. Some day this fault will produce a large earthquake, but other faults all over southern California produce an average of 30 earthquakes each day . We will talk about foreshocks, mainshocks and aftershocks in southern California, and we will cover all the things you should know about earthquakes as a resident of earthquake country.
See the Putting Down Roots in Earthquake Country webpage for more information.

January 18 -Thursday
The Music of Earthquakes Andy Michael, USGS

The Music of Earthquakes mixes performance and lecture, music and science, acoustic instruments and computer generated sounds. A musician controls the source of the sound and the path it travels through their instrument in order to make sound waves that we hear as music. An earthquake is the source of waves that travel along a path through the earth until reaching us as shaking. It is almost as if the earth is a musician and people, including seismologists, are the audience who must try to understand what the music means. By listening to both music and the audio playbacks of the earth shaking, we will explore this analogy and find new ways to learn about the earth, earthquakes, musical instruments and music.
See the Earthquake Quartet #1 webpage for more information.

March 15 - Thursday
Did You Feel It? David Wald, USGS

The most common information available immediately following an earthquake is the location and magnitude. However, what we really want to know is where the shaking was felt, and in the case of emergency response, where it shook the most. Two new systems can now answer these questions within minutes following an earthquake. ShakeMaps show the distribution of earthquake shaking in southern California as measured by the seismic instruments. Community Internet Intensity Maps also show the areas of greatest shaking, but they require the input of Internet users to show where the earthquake was felt and how strongly it shook. Both are available on the Internet. We will talk about how each of these maps are created, what they can be used for, and how you can help.
See the Did You Feel It? and ShakeMap webpages for more information.

May 1 -Tuesday
Pent-up Stress Puts the Squeeze on L.A. Ken Hudnut, USGS

The ground beneath our feet moves a little bit each day. Which direction it is going, and how fast it is going there, tells us something about the earthquake potential in southern California. The Global Positioning System (GPS) has recently become more widely used in our society, but can your GPS unit tell you where you are within a fraction of a millimeter? We will talk about the Southern California Integrated GPS Network that is continuously monitoring the slow movements of the crust in our region, how it measures locations to within a fraction of a millimeter, and why that accuracy is necessary.
See the Southern California Integrated GPS Network webpage for more information.